Thursday, May 30, 2024

Water is essential to life. Knowledge is essential to managing it wisely.

Few issues are as contentious in the American West than disputes over water. Jordan Jimmie is pursuing a Ph.D. in water resource engineering, along with a master’s in biological and ecological engineering, so he can help protect the water rights claims of Indigenous communities.

A member of the Navajo Nation, Jimmie grew up in Flagstaff, Arizona, and on visits to the nearby Navajo Reservation, he saw firsthand the impacts of often-limited access to clean water. That experience led him to pursue a bachelor’s degree in environmental hydrology and water resources at the University of Arizona and a master’s in forestry from the University of Montana, where he focused on tribal water policy.

Jimmie is continuing his education in the Oregon State Graduate School to fulfill his longtime goal of earning a Ph.D. and an engineering degree. He also wants to build a strong set of credentials, especially in the context of advocating on behalf of a tribe, he says. “Knowing what the water laws and policies are and the science behind them will hugely benefit tribes in the future.”

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Monday, May 27, 2024

Happy Memorial Day


Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website




Friday, May 24, 2024

Todd Palmer - 2024 University Distinguished Professors


From the intricacies of the Boltzmann equation to the innovative applications shaping our future, Professor Palmer shares insights into his groundbreaking research at the intersection of nuclear science, applied mathematics, and scientific computing.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Collaboration + creativity = effective learning for all.


The one-size-fits-all model for teaching math can leave some children feeling frustrated and unable to catch up. That’s why Melinda Knapp created the Math Lab — a collaborative program between OSU-Cascades and the Crook County School District that helps teachers cater to a variety of learners.

Through the use of visuals and guided discussion, students can focus on understanding concepts instead of memorizing equations without meaning.

The best way to discover effective teaching methods is to try them out, ask questions, refine and try again. Located in the classroom with students and other teachers present, the Math Lab allows instructors to present different methods — like using cookies to explain a problem or drawing dots to help kindergartners understand whether two numbers are equal. Teachers can call on their colleagues if they get stuck, analyze student responses and brainstorm new or slightly altered teaching strategies following each session.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Saturday, May 18, 2024

Sometimes the path to your goal leads you to unexpected places.

For College of Education undergraduate Marjorie Baker and master’s student Kelsy Weber, the path to becoming a teacher goes through remote Kotzebue, Alaska.

Baker, who is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in education through Oregon State’s double-degree program, is from Kotzebue, a town of 3,200 people known as the gateway to the Arctic. She had planned to be in Corvallis this fall, but as public health conditions worsened, Baker and her advisors concluded she would be better off completing her student teaching at the elementary school in her hometown, where there was some hope of teaching in person.

Weber, a native of Vale, Oregon, earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics at Oregon State in June and immediately started the master’s program to become a middle/high school math teacher. Just days before she was supposed to begin student teaching, Weber’s placement in Salem fell through. Her scramble to find a new placement led her to Kotzebue, where a family friend knew of an opening teaching math at the high school on the same campus where Baker is student teaching.

Read more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Wednesday, May 15, 2024

RCRV Ship Progress Update - Spring 2024


The Regional Class Research Vessel (RCRV) project rapidly progresses as the R/V Taani, R/V Narragansett Dawn and R/V Gilbert R. Mason are constructed in Louisiana.

Research vessels are critical platforms for oceanographers, engineers, marine biologists, students and others to access the marine environment. Part lab, part classroom, part transportation and part hotel, ships like R/V Taani, and R/V Oceanus before it, make marine research possible.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Sunday, May 12, 2024

Happy Mother's Day!


Happy Mother's Day To You.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website



Thursday, May 9, 2024

His work roams Mars. His journey began at Oregon State.


There’s a bit of Beaver Nation on the red planet.

Oregon State alumnus William Allen, ’86, played a key role in the mechanical systems design of NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover, which captured the world’s attention when it recorded video of its own landing in February.

Perseverance is now busy searching for signs of past microbial life and collecting samples for possible return to Earth. The mission, as described by NASA, “provides opportunities to gather knowledge and demonstrate technologies that address the challenges of future human expeditions to Mars.”

Four decades ago, Allen didn’t have his sights set on Mars. But he was determined to get a solid education.

“Oregon State was touted as a good engineering school, and once I stepped foot on that campus, that’s all it took for me,” he says.

Allen grew up in West Los Angeles and spent his childhood taking apart and improving every bicycle or other mechanical device his parents gave him. Anticipating college, he realized he had some catching up to do in advanced math.

“I knew if I stayed home in California that would be harder, so a combination of that and wanting to choose a good engineering school were what brought me to Corvallis. I had to grow up really fast both educationally and personally.”

Read more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website



Monday, May 6, 2024

Feed your brain ⏲️ 6 Minute English


Our brain works very hard 24 hours a day. So, what food should we eat for maximum brain health? Phil and Georgie discuss this and teach you some useful vocabulary.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website

Friday, May 3, 2024

Art for social justice.

The painting on the easel in Julie Green’s Corvallis studio depicts a Chicago brownstone; a geyser, drawn from the image on a Transferware plate Green bought at a local antique mall; a faint amaryllis flower, a symbol of success after a long struggle; a corned beef sandwich and dill pickles; and, poignantly, the text, “Thank God I’m Home.”

Green’s painting is the eighth in a series called “First Meal.” The works pay tribute to the first meals exonerated inmates choose after being released, in some cases after decades of wrongful incarceration. Marcel Brown was freed in July 2018 after nearly a decade in prison.

“First Meal” is in some ways a companion to Green’s well-known “The Last Supper” project, which depicts the last meals death row inmates eat before their execution.  

At first, Green, a professor of fine arts in the College of Liberal Arts, thought the “First Meal” would be a lighter, more joyous project. The pastoral, utopic scenes, like the geyser in Brown’s painting, are a testament to that, but contrast starkly with the text, images of food and the sheer number of years people have spent wrongfully imprisoned.

Read more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website

Lofi Calming Campus

Take a moment to unwind with some calming views of our beautiful campus, here in Corvallis, Oregon. These aerial views capture students walk...