Tuesday, April 30, 2024

Beautiful, flavorful, healthful.

A decade after after introducing Indigo Rose, the first antioxidant-rich, dark purple tomato on the market, Oregon State University vegetable breeders have done it again.

Midnight Roma is the result of crossing Indigo Rose with Oregon Star, a big, fleshy tomato, suitable for slicing or making paste with great flavor. Both Midnight Roma and Indigo Rose contain anthocyanins, the same healthy antioxidants found in blueberries.

Jim Myers, a professor of horticulture in the College of Agricultural Sciences, developed both the Indigo Rose and Midnight Roma. “We were selecting for a really dark Indigo-type processing tomato,” he says. “Ultimately, we got a really nice one.” The Midnight Roma is ideal for home canning, has excellent cooking qualities, and Myers says chefs like it for making sauces. Serious Pie in Seattle, for example, uses Midnight Roma to make pizza sauce.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website

Saturday, April 27, 2024

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques


Matt Abrahams is a lecturer of strategic communication at Stanford GSB and the host of the award-winning podcast "Think Fast, Talk Smart," a show with research-backed techniques becoming a more confident communicator. 

Communication is critical to success in business and in life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about speaking up during a meeting? In this talk, and through the podcast, you will learn techniques that will help you speak with greater confidence and clarity.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Wednesday, April 24, 2024

10 activities for your mental health.

In Town

Irish Bend Covered Bridge

Enjoy a view of Marys Peak after crossing Oak Creek via this historic bridge. Start on campus, head west, and you'll stroll past cows, sheep, and maybe even an egret. You'll go from campus to country quickly. It's easy to forget the daily grind with this walk.

Avery Park

This park is a hop away from the southern edge of campus. Cross over the Marys River and take the first dirt path on your right to escape to a short riverside walk. Disconnect from the daily grind to stop and enjoy the rose garden or lay out a blanket on one of the many fields.

College Hill neighborhood

Just north of campus is a little pocket of history. Transport to a different time with these tree lined streets and houses from the early 1900s. As you walk further from campus, the houses get newer and styles change. Check the corner sidewalks for date stamps as you travel through time. The city of Corvallis has created a self-guided walking tour.

Classic walk through campus: the 2 quads

Whether it’s your first  or 500th time walking through the heart of campus, it’s breathtaking. Stroll through when you’re not rushing to your next class to enjoy the rhodies, the trees, and whatever else happens to show up: a cute puppy, a game of cricket or a beautiful sunset.

Downtown mural project

A little bit further from campus than our other destinations. Take the Gateway Walk near Champinefu Lodge to head downtown. Get lost in tracking down all the murals, either by following the Corvallis Mural Project map or challenging yourself to find them on your own.

Surrounding Area

Fitton Green

This short escape into nature will make you instantly feel happy. Fitton Green is the perfect place to look out onto the city while being surrounded by wildflowers. Bring a walking buddy or your friendly four-legged friend and enjoy some time to clear your mind.

Old growth and new growth trail

Surround yourself with tall trees and hear the wind whistle through the leaves. This trail, located in the heart of the McDonald-Dunn Forest, is a perfect escape on a busy day. You’ll find people running or walking while they take in the views.

Witham Hill Natural Area

A little hidden loop in North Corvallis full of old forest and abandoned orchards. This trail is short and doesn’t take much time out of your schedule. It’s the perfect place to go for a quick breather during lunch or right after class or labs to clear your head.

Peavy Arboretum

Peavy Arboretum offers a variety of trails for all levels. While you’re getting your exercise, you might find some trees that are marked with identification posts so you can learn a little bit about our local landscape while having some fun. For a more educational experience, print this brochure to take a self-guided tour.

Chip Ross Park

Take a moment to enjoy the beautiful views of Corvallis from atop Chip Ross Park. This easy-to-moderate hike is only 1.5 miles through oak woodlands. Climb up to the top, take a deep breath, reflect, enjoy the views and have a feeling of accomplishment.

Read more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website



Sunday, April 21, 2024

Recreation is good for you — and your wallet.

Every time you take a hike, you could save from around $1 to over $7. Go for a jog, and the savings could reach nearly $4. Cross-country skiing? From 83 cents to nearly $8 per outing.

Research from Oregon State University shows increasing Oregonians’ physical activity may help reduce the estimated $39.1 billion we spend each year on health care. Statewide, the study calculated a range from $735 million to $1.416 billion in annual cost-of-illness savings for eight chronic illnesses that are affected by physical activity.

Did you know?

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends adults get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous- intensity aerobic physical activity.

60 percent of adults in Oregon and 63 percent of adults in Benton County meet this recommendation.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Thursday, April 18, 2024

OSU Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network


Agriculture is an occupation full of potential stressors like weather, changing economic markets, animal health and machinery breakdowns. When these start to compound, many farmers experience excessive amounts of stress, making it hard to remain positive and move forward through the hard times. Due in part to the stresses that are faced, agricultural workers have high rates of suicide. The loss of a spouse, parent, sibling, child or friend can be avoided. If you or someone you know is experiencing excessive stress or thoughts of suicide, please reach out to a confidential crisis support line.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Monday, April 15, 2024

This dog harness is made for more than walking.

One out of every 130 dogs is affected by epilepsy. Their seizures are often distressing, and it can be difficult to track them all — especially while the owner is asleep or away.  To give owners more information and better control over their dog’s treatment, OSU-Cascades computer science alumna Marji Symonds, ’21, developed a health monitoring device that attaches to a dog’s harness.

Symonds discovered just how difficult it can be to witness seizures while trying to provide protection and comfort for her friend’s pug, Sophie. Sophie’s seizures were often caused by overstimulation, excitement, overexertion and excessive heat, while others appeared to be random. Sophie had a very strict medication regimen and had to be restrained during episodes to avoid injury. Symonds was determined to find a better solution for dogs like Sophie. With the smart dog harness, she has.

The device, which Symonds calls a smart dog harness, connects over Wi-Fi and sends data to cloud storage. It collects data from an accelerometer and gyroscope sensor to measure a dog’s movement and orientation. Through machine learning, the device differentiates between activities like sleeping, walking, running, a car ride and a seizure. The movement data of a seizure is so unique that it is rarely confused with any other activity. When a seizure is detected, the device sends an alert to the owner’s phone.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Friday, April 12, 2024

Instigating change has a ripple effect.

His drive is fueled by one dream: to impact the lives of people in his home country for the better. And at Oregon State University, Sylvester Omondi is gaining the knowledge, experiences and skills to achieve it.

The dream began when Omondi was in high school, participating in model United Nations conferences that inspired him to lead on a global scale. In January 2021, Omondi arrived at Oregon State University with a plan to achieve this goal — by developing his leadership abilities and public policy knowledge, learning about other cultures and building his portfolio of advocacy work. A sophomore and computer science major in the College of Engineering, Omondi chose Oregon State because of its vision for graduates — that they can be successful no matter what they decide to pursue and receive support throughout their time here. He adds that Oregon State’s location — with the mountains, beach and desert all nearby — allows him to explore the variety of landscapes in the U.S.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website

Tuesday, April 9, 2024

How smart are dolphins? - Lori Marino


Dolphins are one of the smartest animal species on Earth. In fact, their encephalization quotient (their brain size compared to the average for their body size) is second only to humans. But exactly how smart are they? Lori Marino details some incredible facts about dolphins.

Lesson by Lori Marino, animation by Zedem Media.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Saturday, April 6, 2024

If you can see it, you can do it.

Visualizing yourself as a doctor, surgeon or medical specialist can feel like a stretch — especially if you don’t have someone to guide you along the way. So MedStaircase is stepping into that role — giving traditionally underrepresented students opportunities to see themselves working in health care.

Established in May 2021, MedStaircase is a collaborative effort between physicians, led by Kate Ropp M.D., an anesthesiologist in Portland who earned a degree in biology from Oregon State in 2003. The nonprofit connects medical professionals with students interested in medicine, providing support and access to help them pursue their career goals.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Wednesday, April 3, 2024

Stress can have undetected effects on mental health.

Farmers die by suicide at twice the rate of the general population. Poor financial situations, crop failures, equipment breakdowns, weather and injuries are among the contributing factors. But the impacts these stresses have on farmers’ mental health aren’t always seen.

In response, the USDA-NIFA created the Farm and Stress Assistance Network in 2020 —and OSU Extension is spreading the word.

Oregon State is part of four regional Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network entities across the U.S., funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. FRSAN provides multiple resources to those working in agriculture, including a mental health self-assessment. It also includes a training program known as QPR, short for Question, Persuade, Refer. These 90-minute training sessions help families, friends and colleagues of farmers and ranchers understand the signs of depression and suicide, as well as how and when to step in. QPR training is offered via free webinars throughout the year.

Learn more, here.

Trent Lundy
971-304-9750

331 NW 26th Street
Corvallis, OR 97330

Email
tlundy5522@gmail.com

Website


Lofi Calming Campus

Take a moment to unwind with some calming views of our beautiful campus, here in Corvallis, Oregon. These aerial views capture students walk...